Topics: Media Science

This field of study engages in education and research of cutting-edge virtual reality and multimedia processing technology dealing with geometric modeling and representation of shapes, real-time rendering and GPU design in computer graphics, 3D computer animation, image processing and pattern recognition, audio, acoustic and speech signal processing.

Prof. Hiroshi HANAIZUMI

Prof. Hiroshi HANAIZUMI

Multi-dimensional Image Processing Lab

Hiroshi HANAIZUMI
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Communication Engineering)

Research area:

  • Image Processing
Laboratory

Hiroshi HANAIZUMI was born in Fukushima, Japan on February 16, 1956. He received the B.Sc. degree in communication engineering from the University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo, Japan, in 1978, and the M.Sc. and Dr. Eng. Degrees in instrumentation physics from The University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1980 and 1987, respectively. From 1981 to 1987 he was a research assistant at the Department of Mathematical Engineering and Information Physics, The University of Tokyo. He joined Hosei University in 1987 as a Lecturer in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, and was an Associate Professor from 1989 to 1995, and has been a Professor since 1996. Since 2000, he has been a Professor at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University.

His current research areas include remote sensing, face recognition and 3D medical image processing.

He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society, Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society, Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication engineers, and Society of Instrument and Control Engineers.

Message

My research focuses on image processing and recognition. Images have much information on the objects, for example, remotely sensed images include spectral, spatial and temporal information about terrain objects, and face images personal information. The main purpose of the image processing is to extract the information by using various techniques. Noise reduction is one of very important processing in these techniques. The information extracted is then generalized with the physical properties (priori information) and is used for recognizing “what or how is the object”. The recognized results are used as sources of digital media. I want to realize smart recognition like human. My current research interests are image processing in remote sensing, medical image processing and person recognition from face image. My hobbies are reading and gardening.

Prof. Katunobu ITOU

Prof. Katunobu ITOU

Speech, Audio and Language Processing Lab

Katunobu ITOU
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Communication Engineering)

Research area:

  • Speech Recognition
  • Multi-Modal Dialog System
  • Speech Interface
Laboratory

Katunobu ITOU received the B.E., M.E. and Ph.D degress in computer science from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1988, 1990 and 1993 respectively. From 2003 to 2006, he was an associate professor at Graduate School of Information Science of the Nagoya University. In 2006, he joined the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University, Japan, as a Professor.

His current research interest is spoken language processing.
He is a member of the Information Processing Society of Japan and the Acoustical Society of Japan.

Prof. Vladimir SAVCHENKO

Prof. Vladimir SAVCHENKO

Shape Modeling Lab

Vladimir SAVCHENKO
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Theoretical Mechanics)

Research area:

  • Geometric Modeling
  • CG
  • Animation
Laboratory

Vladimir SAVCHENKO was born in Taganrog city, Russia, May 15, 1947. He came to Hosei University from the University of Aizu (Japan) where he was a head of Shape Modeling Lab and undergraduate/graduate teacher. Before 1993 he was deputy director and a head of Computational Mechanics Lab at the Scientific Institute of System Analysis of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Moscow). Up to 1987 he was senior research assistant at the Institute of Applied Mathematics of Russian Academy of Sciences.

Education:

  • Institute of Applied Mathematics, Moscow, Russia
  • Ph.D., Theoretical Mechanics, 1982-1985
  • Moscow Aviation Institute, Department “Space crafts”, Moscow, Russia
  • MS, Mechanical Engineering, 1965, Sept., 1971, Feb.
  • His research interests: Geometric Modeling, Computer Graphics, Physically based simulation, Artificial Life, Parallel processing, Haptic Visualization.
  • He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society
  • He received the awards:
  • Bronze Prize Computer Graphics Grand Prix in STEC, Tokyo, Japan, 1996
  • Best WWW Award EUROGRAPHICS’96, Poitiers, 1996
  • Government order “Znak Pocheta”, 1985
  • Government medal “Za Trudowoe Otlichie”, 1975

Message

Shape modeling is an interdisciplinary area composing theoretical and experimental results from mathematics, physics, computer graphics, computer-aided design, computer animation, and others fields. Shape modeling and mathematical simulation stand side by side, and one upholds the other. The heart of my work was solving applied problems of mathematical simulation. In general, I am interested in a problem of mathematical simulation which includes three main parts: mathematical model, numerical method and programming realization.

Now I am involved in a number of projects, such as

Applications of genetic algorithms in shape modeling, Converting elevation contours to a grid, Java implementation of Turtle Graphics in 3-D, Designing client/server applications dealing with geometric modeling.

This projects has been initiated by previous investigations in the field of computer graphics, shape modeling and by recent advance in Java programming. Some of the motivation for this projects can be ascribed to general good sense and the recognition of the Java technology whose time has come. Java provides the right programming paradigm to make use of the distributed machines to speed up calculations. Designing client/server applications may lure students into writing very sophisticated programs, development of collaborative Internet-based computer graphics and shape modeling applications.
Hobbies

Classic music (Tchaikovsky, Beethoven). American country music. Japanese music (Kitaro) and songs (Tanimura).
Water and alpine skiing.

Prof. Toru WAKAHARA

Prof. Toru WAKAHARA

Pattern Recognition Lab

Toru WAKAHARA
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Mathematical Engineering and Information Physics)

Research area:

  • Intelligent Image Processing
  • Pattern Recognition
Laboratory

Toru WAKAHARA was born in Gifu, Japan, on January 30, 1952. He received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in applied physics and the Ph.D. degree in mathematical engineering and information physics from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 1975, 1977, and 1986, respectively. From 1977 to 1986, he was with the Basic Research Laboratories, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT), Tokyo, Japan, where he was engaged in research of on-line handwriting recognition. From 1987 to 2000, he was with the Human Interface Laboratories, Cyber Space Laboratories, and Cyber Solutions Laboratories, NTT, Kanagawa, Japan, where he was engaged in research and development of machine-printed and multi-font character recognition system, advanced handwritten character recognition system, pen-based interface, and biometric authentication system. From 1991 to 1993, he was posted to the Institute for Posts and Telecommunications Policy (IPTP), Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications, Japan, where he conducted the first, second, and third IPTP character recognition competitions and studies on multi-expert system for handwritten 3-digit postcode and postal address recognition. Since April 2001, he has been a professor of the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University.

His research interests include learning and generalization in pattern recognition, intelligent image processing, human visual perception, and human-computer interaction.

He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society and the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers of Japan (IEICE).

He received a Special Achievement Award in 1994 from the Institute for Posts and Telecommunications Policy (IPTP), Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications, Japan.

Message

A lively intellectual curiosity in your study and research is most essential to taking a genuine delight in your academic life. In order to activate such curiosity, you have to think over what is an important problem worth focusing your energy on. In other words, finding a good problem is most valuable, and its solution is another thing.

Prof. Yasunari ZEMPO

Prof. Yasunari ZEMPO

Computational Physics Lab

Yasunari ZEMPO
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Physics)

Research area:

  • Computational materials science
  • Development of computational techniques for material design and property prediction
  • Large-scale parallel computing
Laboratory

Yasunari ZEMPO was born in Kure, Japan on May 18, 1956. He received the B.S. and M.S. degree from Hiroshima University in 1980, and 1982, respectively. In the field of theoretical materials science, he received Ph.D. in physics from Hiroshima University, Japan in 1985. He was formerly with Tsukuba Research Laboratory, Sumitomo Chemical, where he was engaged in the computational materials science, and its practical applications using very large scale computers. He was an experienced researcher in the industry, until he joined the faculty of Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University, in 2009.

His current research areas include computational materials science, and computational physics as well as high performance computing.

He is a member of the physical society of Japan, American physical society, and the Japan society for industrial and applied mathematics.

Message

Our society owes its present prosperity to its industrial growth, which is right now realized by computer-simulation based researches. This new type of research is now extensively being applied to all fields of science and engineering. We hope to contribute to the society through our simulation techniques. If you would like to learn the necessary basic skills and techniques, just visit us. Recent computational techniques can be experienced through solving various practical-level exercises and programming.

Prof. Takafumi KOIKE

Prof. Takafumi KOIKE

Computational Reality Lab

Takafumi KOIKE
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Information and Communication Engineering)

Research area:

  • Media technologies connected between real world and cyber world
  • Real-time computer graphics
  • Augmented reality
  • Computational photography
  • 3D imaging
Laboratory

Takafumi Koike received the B.S. in physics from Tokyo Institute of Technology, the M.E. in mathematical engineering and information physics from The University of Tokyo, and Ph.D. in information and communication engineering from The University of Tokyo, in 1995, 1997, and 2009, respectively. He was formerly a senior researcher at Yokohama Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd. Since 2013, he has been a professor at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University.
His research interests include media technologies connected between real world and cyber world, light field displays, computational photography, and virtual/augmented/mixed reality.
He is a member of the ACM, the IEEE, and the OSA.

Message

I want to create a richer society by media technologies. One of my favorite texts is “Think like an amateur and execute like an expert (by Prof. Kanade, CMU)”. If you feel empathy for this text, please contact me!