Topics: Parallel and distributed computing

Covers various technology aspects:

  • Parallel and distributed algorithms
  • Language and compiler supports for PDS
  • Parallel and distributed computer architectures
  • High performance computing technologies for numeric and non-numeric applications.

Research targets

Parallel computing technologies are applied for almost all IT systems nowadays. IT professionals and researchers are required to have enough knowledge and skills in the field. The course covers various key technologies such as, large scale inter-connection networks, cloud computing, parallel and distributed programming models, complier supports for PDS and high performance computing applications.

Prof. Toshio HIROTSU

Prof. Toshio HIROTSU

Distributed Systems Lab

Toshio HIROTSU
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Doctor (Engeering)

Research area:

  • Internet
  • Operating System
  • Distributed Computing
  • Ubiquitous Computing

Toshio HIROTSU received M.E and ph.D. degrees in computer science from Keio University in 1992, 1995, respectively. From 1995 to 2004, he worked in NTT Laboratories, Japan. He was in the Department of Information and Computer Science at Toyohashi University of Technology as an Associate Professor from 2004 to 2009. He joined the faculty of the Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University in 2009.

His current research interests include system software for Internet, access network, cluster computing, virtualization and the ubiquitous computing.

He is a member of the ACM, IEEE, IPSJ and JSSST.

Message

System software is the generic name for the software working for other software. It includes operating systems, middleware, server software, management software, and virtualization supervisors. My research focuses on the system software increasing the security and the performance of the computer systems connecting to the both of the client and server sides of the Internet.

Prof. Nobuhiko KOIKE

Prof. Nobuhiko KOIKE

Parallel Processing Systems Lab

Nobuhiko KOIKE
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Research area:

  • Software Engineering
Home Page

Nobuhiko KOIKE was born in Tokyo, Japan on October 14, 1947. He received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in Electrical engineering from Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan in 1970, 1972 respectively. He received the Phd. from Tokyo University in 1991. He was formerly with C&C Research Laboratories of NEC Corporation, where he was engaged in design and development of parallel machines including: parallel logic simulation machine HAL, parallel circuit simulation machine Cenju, and massively parallel machine Cenju-3 and Cenju-4. From 1996 to 1999, he served as the general manager of newly found C&C Research Laboratories NEC Europe, located in Germany. Since 2000, he has been a Professor at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University.

His current research areas include: parallel computer architecture and its applications in scientific and intelligent computing.

He is a member of the IEICE of Japan and Information Processing Society of Japan. He received the best paper award in 1985, the 25 year’s anniversary best paper award in 1985, and the 30 year’s anniversary best paper award in 1990, from the Information Processing Society of Japan.

Message

My research area focuses on achieving high-performance applying parallel and distributed processing technologies in both scientific and intelligent computing areas. With the advancement of microprocessor, parallel processing is becoming important technology. However, exploiting parallelisms in applications and mapping them onto actual parallel machines become difficult if the number of processors is increased. Current research interest is to apply PC cluster system to important applications, such as DNA information processing.
My hobbies are Sailing-ship model building, Classical music listening and Skiing.

Prof. Yamin LI

Prof. Yamin LI

Computer Architecture Lab

Yamin LI
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D (Computer Science)

Research area:

  • Computer Architecture
  • Parallel and Distributed Systems
  • Mobile Ad Hoc Networks
Laboraory

Yamin LI received his BS, MS, and Ph.D degrees in computer science and engineering from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China in 1982, 1984, 1989, respectively. From 1984 to 1993, he was a faculty member of Tsinghua University. From 1993 to 2000, he was an associate professor of University of Aizu. Since 2000, he has been a professor at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University.

His current research interests include: advanced computer organization and architecture, distributed and parallel computer architecture, parallel multithreaded architecture, and computer arithmetic algorithm and hardware implementation.
He is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of the IEEE Computer Society.

Prof. Akira SASAKI

Prof. Akira SASAKI

Programming Language Lab

Akira SASAKI
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Science)

Research area:

  • Programming Languages
  • Domain Specific Languages
  • Attribute Grammars
Laboraory

Akira SASAKI received his BSc, MSc and Ph.D in Science from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, in 1994, 1996, and 2004, respectively. He was a research associate of The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (2003.1-2005.9), and of Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology (2005.9-2006.3). From April 2006, he joined the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University, Japan as an Associate Professor.

His research interests include programming languages, programming language processors, and programming environments, especially compiler compilers, attribute grammars, and systematic debugging. He is a member of ACM, and the Japan Society for Software Science and Technology.

Message

We study domain specific language (DSLs), programming languages specialized for developing software on specific fields. Especially, our research focuses on the methodologies to design and to implement DSLs in efficient ways.

Prof. Shaoying LIU

Prof. Shaoying LIU

High-Quality Software Engineering Lab

Shaoying LIU
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Computer Science)

Research area:

  • Software Engineering
  • Formal Engineering Methods
  • Intelligent Software Engineering
Laboraory

Shaoying LIU was born in Shannxi Province, China on April 25, 1960. He received a B.Sc and an M.Sc. degrees in Computer Science both from Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, China in 1982 and 1987, respectively, and a Ph.D in Computer Science from the University of Manchester, U.K. in 1992. From 1982 to 1988, he worked as an Assistant Lecturer and Lecturer, respectively, in the Department of Computer Science at Xi’an Jiaotong University. From 1991 to 1994, he worked as a Research Associate in the Department of Computer Science at the University of York, and as a Research Assistant in the Department of Computer Science at the Royal Holloway and Bedford New College of London University, respectively. In 1994 he joined Hiroshima City University, Japan, as an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science, and he worked there until March 2000. He was invited as a Visiting Research Fellow by The Queen’s University of Belfast, Northern Ireland, U.K., in 1994, and an Academic Visitor by the Computing Laboratory at Oxford University, U.K., in 1998. In April 2000, he joined the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University, Japan, as an Associate Professor, and then a Professor since April 2001.

His current research areas include: formal engineering methods, internet-based intelligent software engineering supporting environments, and safety-critical and complex computer systems. In particular, he has been concentrating on the research of developing a formal engineering method called SOFL and related software verification techniques, such as fault tree analysis, specification testing, and specification-based program testing.

He is a member of the IEEE Computer Science Society. He received an “Outstanding Paper Award” at 1996 IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems (ICECCS’96) and a “Certificate of Appreciation for Outstanding Service as ICFEM’97 General Chair and Founder” at 1997 IEEE International Conference on Formal Engineering Methods (ICFEM’97) from IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Complexity in Computing.

Message

The goal of my research is to provide effective languages, methods, and supporting environments for developing reliable and robust complex software systems. To reach this goal, my own and my group’s research has been centered on the development of a formal engineering method called SOFL, standing for Structured Object-Oriented Formal Language, and the rigorous software verification techniques, such as fault tree analysis and testing. Recently, I am more interested in research on internet-based intelligent software engineering supporting environments, and application of formal engineering methods to safety-critical and complex computer systems.

My hobby includes table tennis, soccer, and Karaoke.

Prof. Toshihisa NISHIJIMA

Prof. Toshihisa NISHIJIMA

Coding Theory Lab

Toshihisa NISHIJIMA
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Doctor (Engineering)

Research area:

  • Coding Theory
  • Information Theory

Toshihisa NISHIJIMA was born in Hiroshima, Japan on January 10, 1959. He received the B.E., M.E. and Ph.D. degrees in industrial engineering and management from Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan in 1983, 1985, 1991, respectively. From 1985 to 1987, he was with the Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan. He joined the Kanagawa Institute of Technology, Kanagawa, Japan as a Research Associate from 1987 to 1993 and the Faculty Engineering, Hosei University, Tokyo, Japan as an Associate Professor from 1993 to 2000. From 2000 to 2001, he was an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University and then a professor since April 2001.

His current research areas include algebraic coding theory, error control systems, and information theory.

He is a member of the IEEE Information Theory Society, Communications Society, Computer Society, the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineerings of Japan, and the Society for Information Theory and Its Applications of Japan.

Message

I started my academic life in the theory of algebraic error-correcting codes and its applications, and have recently been interested also in information theory. For the past 15 years I have been studying on the asymptotic capability of algebraic error-correcting codes, which are able to prove Shannon’s fundamental theorem for noisy channel not by random coding technique but by constructive coding. Now I would like to study on Shannon’s channel coding theorem from the viewpoints of both the reliability function in information theory and the asymptotic distance ratio in coding theory. As the final purpose (dream) in my academic life, I will try to challenge the fundamental problems to determine the reliability function for low rates and to clarify relationship between the reliability function and the asymptotic distance ratio.

Prof. Shuichi YUKITA

Prof. Shuichi YUKITA

Inference Visualization Lab

Shuichi YUKITA
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Computer Science)

Research area:

  • Cellular Automata Theory
  • Algorithmic Mathematics
  • Mathematical Visualization
Laboraory

Shuichi YUKITA was born in Chiba, Japan on January 12, 1954. He received the B.S. degree in physics, M.S. degree in mathematics from Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan in 1976 and 1978, respectively. He received the Ph.D. degree in information science from Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan in 2000. From 1983 to 1987, he was with Toyo University, Saitama, Japan. From 1987 to 1993, he was with Wakkanai-Hokusei junior college, Hokkaido, Japan. From 1993 to March/2000, he was with the University of Aizu, Fukushima, Japan. In April 2000, he joined the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University, Japan, as an Associate Professor, and then a Professor since April 2001.

His current research areas include cellular automata theory, algorithmic mathematics, and mathematical visualization.

He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society, IEICE, IPSJ, Mathematical Society of Japan, and JSIAM.

Message

Find your own winning way in the game of theoretical thinking that involves lots of mathematics and scientific discovery. While playing this game, we apply the dialogue engineering (or dialectical) technique. Dialogue may be sometimes monologue, where dialogue occurs between one and oneself, and, of course, dialogue may be actual dialogue in seminar talks and other presentations. My main research theme can be termed as dialogue engineering.

Prof. Soichiro HIDAKA

Prof. Soichiro HIDAKA

Infrastructure Software Lab

Soichiro HIDAKA
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Engineering)

Research area:

  • Programming Languages
  • Program Transformations
  • Bidirectional Transformations and
    their Applications to Model Driven Engineering
Researchmap Home Page

Soichiro Hidaka received his bachelor’s degree in engineering and Ph. D in Engineering from the University of Tokyo in 1994 and 1999. He had involved in research projects such as parallel programming language implementation, micro-kernel based operating system and document processing system. He is interested in studies on infrastructure software systems and particularly on database programming languages. Recently he has been conducting research on bidirectional graph transformations that is intended to facilitate bidirectional model transformations. He had visited AtlanMod team in Ecole des Mines de Nantes for 1 month starting from Apr. 21 2010, and attended seminar on Bidirectional Transformations “”bx”” at Dagstuhl in January 2011. He served as a member of NII Shonan Meeting steering committee until March 2016. He is a member of Bidirectional Transformations steering committee.

He is a member of IEEE, ACM, Japan Society for Software Science and Technology (JSSST), Information Processing Society of Japan (IPSJ) and Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers (IEICE).

Message

Transformations can be seen in various situations in information processing. For example, a query can be considered as a transformation from source (database) to target (result/view). It is desirable for the updates to be propagable not only from source to target, but also in the opposite direction. However, the latter — propagating updates to the source — is not so obvious. Bidirectional transformation achieves this propagation, and we have recently proposed and implemented a compositional approach to bidirectional transformation on graphs. One of our applications of the bidirectional graph transformation is to support consistent model transformation in model driven software development.

Soichiro Hidaka is leading a research subproject on bidirectionalization of graph transformation as a part of The BiG (http://www.biglab.org) project on “”Linguistic Approach to Bidirectional Model Transformation””, whose focus is on the above applications. The project is establishing graph transformation framework for model transformation by representing models as graphs.