Program Features

The Department of Computer Science conducts education and research in computer fundamentals: namely, computer architectures, languages, and intelligence.

The elementary courses provide an introduction to Information Science and explain what computers are, how they can be used and how to write computer programs. In addition, students receive a detailed grounding in the fundamental mathematics and physics required for more advanced subjects in computer science.

The core curriculum consists of courses in digital circuitry (an integral element of computer hardware), computer architectures, core software operating systems, programming languages and program development environments. Students also learn how programs are translated into computer instructions as well as about topics in data storage and retrieval.

The advanced curriculum enables students to deepen their understanding particularly of topics in artificial intelligence, soft computing, parallel processing, and computer architectures.

The Artificial Intelligence and Soft Computing course focuses on the rapidly developing field of artificial intelligence as a new form of soft computing. The Parallel Processing and Computer Architecture course provides advanced training in new computer hardware and software architectures, with a focus on algorithms.

The curriculum also includes an Information Science project that students start in their first year as a means of honing their skills in conceptualization and the recognition and solution of problems, an Education Assistance course that allows students to serve as assistants in high-school computer education programs, a Special Computer Science Seminar that exposes students to the latest papers of relevance to their graduate thesis; and a Computer Science Graduate Thesis course.

Message from the Department Chair of Computer Science

Welcome to the Department of Computer Science

From the year of 2012, we established the Course Systems in our faculty. Currently, there are three courses: “Computer Science Course”, “Communication Science Course”, and “Media Science Course”. After the first year studies, the students in CS department can select the Computer Science Course or Communication Science Course for their second and third years’ studies. The Computer Science Course focuses on the core areas of computer science. In this course, the students not only can deeply understand the theoretical computer science, but also can design hardware circuits such as embedded CPUs, input/output controllers, and high-performance CPUs, and develop system software and applications, such as compilers, drivers, and large-scale database applications. The Communication Science Course focuses on the communications among computers and the communications between humans and computers. The students can learn the contents of the augmented reality, computer graphics (CG), artificial intelligence, cyberworlds, The Internet and security, user interfaces, and game design. The main course in the fourth year is the graduation research. The students can join a laboratory, research themes they are interested in, write graduation research theses, and finally present their research results.

Soichiro HIDAKA, Professor, Dr.

Soichiro HIDAKA, Professor, Dr.

Department Chair of Computer Science

Computers are used everywhere, such as in homes, factories, offices, transportations, banks, and computing centers. These computers contain either low-cost embedded CPUs or high-performance multithreading multi-core CPUs. Because of the advances in computer and networking technologies, supercomputers containing hundreds of thousands of nodes have been built. It has been predicted that the parallel systems of the next decade will contain 10 to 100 millions of nodes. Another hot topic in the computer science field is “cloud computing,” which provides a convenient environment for access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources through the network and Internet. These technological advances or inventions have changed and are changing our lives and society. You are welcome to join our CS department to learn how to cope with these challenges and make your contributions to the future of our world!

Professors of Computer Science

Prof. Mina AKAISHI

Prof. Mina AKAISHI

Information Compilation Lab

Mina AKAISHI
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Engineering)

Research area:

  • Narrativity based Information Access

Mina AKAISHI received the B.E., M.E. and Ph.D degrees in Electorical Engineering from Hokkaido University in 1990, 1992 and 1995 respectively. Before joining Hosei University, she was an Associate Researcher at Shizuoka University and Hokkaido University, and an Associate Professor at the University of Tokyo.

Prof. Satoshi OBANA

Prof. Satoshi OBANA

Information Security Lab

Satoshi OBANA
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Doctor (Engineering)

Research area:

  • Cryptography
  • Information Security

I study cryptography and information security which enable us to securely deal with our important and/or confidential data stored in open networks.

With the rapid spread of cloud computing, more and more services are deployed on servers in open networks. These servers are not necessarily trusted and are good target of crackers who aim at accessing to confidential data illegally. In fact, many incidents of information leakage from servers in open networks are reported today.

My research interests are, therefore, technologies tolerable to information leakage. In particular, I study secret sharing scheme and computation on encrypted data. Secret sharing scheme is a cryptographic protocol in which secret data is devided into multiple pieces in a way that no one can obtain any partial information about the secret unless (predetermined) number of pieces are collected. Computation on encrypted data is also a cryptographic protocol which enables us to process (e.g., search, compute statistics) encrypted data without decrypting them. I believe these technologies will help us to store our important and confidential data in open networks without fear.

Prof. Satoru S. KANO

Prof. Satoru S. KANO

Satoru S. KANO
Professor (Computer Science)

◾Ph.D. (Physics)

Research area:

  • Nonlinear Laser Spectroscopy

Dr.Satoru S. KANO received a BS in Physics from the University of Tokyo in 1972. He received an MS in physics in 1974 and a PhD in physics (quantum electronics and molecular physics) in 1977, both from the University of Tokyo, Japan. He worked as a research associate at the Department of Physics at the University of Tokyo until 1979. He was a visiting scientist at IBM San Jose Research Laboratory from 1977 to 1978 on partial leave from the University of Tokyo. He worked at Central Research Laboratory of Komatsu Ltd. from 1979 to 1980 as a research staff member. From 1980 until 1987, Dr. Kano was an associate professor at Institute for Laser Science at University of Electro-communications in Chofu, Tokyo. He also worked at Institute of Plasma Physics at Nagoya University from 1985 until 1987 as an associate professor (visiting). He worked for IBM Tokyo Research aboratory from 1987 until 1996 as the Manager of Advanced Optics, Advanced Technology Institute. During his service at IBM, he was a professor (visiting), New Laser Device, RCAST (Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology), the University of Tokyo from 1991 to 1993. From 1996 until 2000, Dr. Kano worked for the School of Engineering, Hosei University as a full professor, and he has been at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences since 2000. From 1999 to 2001, he was a professor (visiting) at the Department of Photoscience, School of Advanced Science, at the Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa, Japan.

His current research is on nonlinear laser spectroscopy and its application to surface science and chemical reactions, especially in coherent manipulation of molecules, and runs experiments jointly with chemists at Kobe University.

He is a member of the Japan Society of Applied Physics, the Physical Society of Japan, and the Chemical Society of Japan.

Prof. Nobuhiko KOIKE

Prof. Nobuhiko KOIKE

Parallel Processing Systems Lab

Nobuhiko KOIKE
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering)

Research area:

  • Software Engineering
Home Page

Nobuhiko KOIKE was born in Tokyo, Japan on October 14, 1947. He received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in Electrical engineering from Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan in 1970, 1972 respectively. He received the Phd. from Tokyo University in 1991. He was formerly with C&C Research Laboratories of NEC Corporation, where he was engaged in design and development of parallel machines including: parallel logic simulation machine HAL, parallel circuit simulation machine Cenju, and massively parallel machine Cenju-3 and Cenju-4. From 1996 to 1999, he served as the general manager of newly found C&C Research Laboratories NEC Europe, located in Germany. Since 2000, he has been a Professor at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University.

His current research areas include: parallel computer architecture and its applications in scientific and intelligent computing.

He is a member of the IEICE of Japan and Information Processing Society of Japan. He received the best paper award in 1985, the 25 year’s anniversary best paper award in 1985, and the 30 year’s anniversary best paper award in 1990, from the Information Processing Society of Japan.

Message

My research area focuses on achieving high-performance applying parallel and distributed processing technologies in both scientific and intelligent computing areas. With the advancement of microprocessor, parallel processing is becoming important technology. However, exploiting parallelisms in applications and mapping them onto actual parallel machines become difficult if the number of processors is increased. Current research interest is to apply PC cluster system to important applications, such as DNA information processing.
My hobbies are Sailing-ship model building, Classical music listening and Skiing.

Prof. Akira SASAKI

Prof. Akira SASAKI

Programming Language Lab

Akira SASAKI
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Science)

Research area:

  • Programming Languages
  • Domain Specific Languages
  • Attribute Grammars
Laboraory

Akira SASAKI received his BSc, MSc and Ph.D in Science from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, in 1994, 1996, and 2004, respectively. He was a research associate of The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (2003.1-2005.9), and of Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology (2005.9-2006.3). From April 2006, he joined the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University, Japan as an Associate Professor.

His research interests include programming languages, programming language processors, and programming environments, especially compiler compilers, attribute grammars, and systematic debugging. He is a member of ACM, and the Japan Society for Software Science and Technology.

Message

We study domain specific language (DSLs), programming languages specialized for developing software on specific fields. Especially, our research focuses on the methodologies to design and to implement DSLs in efficient ways.

Prof. Yuji SATO

Prof. Yuji SATO

Intelligent Evolutionary System Lab

Yuji SATO
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Engineering)

Research area:

  • Evolutionary Computation
  • Machine Learning
Laboratory

Yuji SATO was born in Tokyo, Japan on July 3, 1957. He received the B.E. degree in applied physics and Ph.D. degree in Electrical engineering from the University of Tokyo, Japan in 1981, 1997, respectively. From 1981 to 2000, he was with the Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo, Japan, where he was engaged in research and development of computer-aided design automation systems, an intelligent sub-processor for hardware emulation, and a high-performance neuro-processor of digital neurons. From 1992 to 1995, he was also temporarily transferred to Real World Computing Partnership, Tsukuba, Japan, where he was engaged in research of genetic algorithms for time-series problems. In April 2000, he joined the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University, Japan, as an Associate Professor, and then a Professor since April 2001. From 2007 to 2008, he was a visiting scholar at Illinois Genetic Algorithms Laboratory (IlliGAL).

His current research areas include: computational intelligence, evolutionary computation on many-core architecture, and evolution of machine learning techniques in design.

He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society, IEEE Computational Intelligence Society, the ACM/SIGEVO, the Japanese Society for Evolutionary Computation, and the Information Processing Society of Japan.

Message

My research and that of my graduate students focus on distributed genetic algorithms on many-core architecture, computational intelligence in Games, and evolutionary computation for real-world applications. I want to bring up talented people with the creatively.

My personal interests include playing tennis, traveling, and gardening.

Prof. Soichiro HIDAKA

Prof. Soichiro HIDAKA

Infrastructure Software Lab

Soichiro HIDAKA
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Engineering)

Research area:

  • Programming Languages
  • Program Transformations
  • Bidirectional Transformations and
    their Applications to Model Driven Engineering
Researchmap Home Page

Soichiro Hidaka received his bachelor’s degree in engineering and Ph. D in Engineering from the University of Tokyo in 1994 and 1999. He had involved in research projects such as parallel programming language implementation, micro-kernel based operating system and document processing system. He is interested in studies on infrastructure software systems and particularly on database programming languages. Recently he has been conducting research on bidirectional graph transformations that is intended to facilitate bidirectional model transformations. He had visited AtlanMod team in Ecole des Mines de Nantes for 1 month starting from Apr. 21 2010, and attended seminar on Bidirectional Transformations “”bx”” at Dagstuhl in January 2011. He served as a member of NII Shonan Meeting steering committee until March 2016. He is a member of Bidirectional Transformations steering committee.

He is a member of IEEE, ACM, Japan Society for Software Science and Technology (JSSST), Information Processing Society of Japan (IPSJ) and Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers (IEICE).

Message

Transformations can be seen in various situations in information processing. For example, a query can be considered as a transformation from source (database) to target (result/view). It is desirable for the updates to be propagable not only from source to target, but also in the opposite direction. However, the latter — propagating updates to the source — is not so obvious. Bidirectional transformation achieves this propagation, and we have recently proposed and implemented a compositional approach to bidirectional transformation on graphs. One of our applications of the bidirectional graph transformation is to support consistent model transformation in model driven software development.

Soichiro Hidaka is leading a research subproject on bidirectionalization of graph transformation as a part of The BiG (http://www.biglab.org) project on “”Linguistic Approach to Bidirectional Model Transformation””, whose focus is on the above applications. The project is establishing graph transformation framework for model transformation by representing models as graphs.

Prof. Toshio HIROTSU

Prof. Toshio HIROTSU

Distributed Systems Lab

Toshio HIROTSU
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Doctor (Engeering)

Research area:

  • Internet
  • Operating System
  • Distributed Computing
  • Ubiquitous Computing

Toshio HIROTSU received M.E and ph.D. degrees in computer science from Keio University in 1992, 1995, respectively. From 1995 to 2004, he worked in NTT Laboratories, Japan. He was in the Department of Information and Computer Science at Toyohashi University of Technology as an Associate Professor from 2004 to 2009. He joined the faculty of the Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University in 2009.

His current research interests include system software for Internet, access network, cluster computing, virtualization and the ubiquitous computing.

He is a member of the ACM, IEEE, IPSJ and JSSST.

Message

System software is the generic name for the software working for other software. It includes operating systems, middleware, server software, management software, and virtualization supervisors. My research focuses on the system software increasing the security and the performance of the computer systems connecting to the both of the client and server sides of the Internet.

Prof. Runhe HUANG

Prof. Runhe HUANG

Artificial Intelligence Lab

Runhe HUANG
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Computer Science)

Research area:

  • Evolutionary Computation
  • Machine Learning
Laboratory

Runhe HUANG received her B.Sc. in Electronics Technology from the National University of Defense Technology, China in 1982, and her Ph.D. in Computer Science and Mathematics from the University of the West of England, UK in 1993. She worked at the National University of Defense Technology over the period 1982-1988. In 1988, she received a Sino-Britain Friendship Scholarship for her Ph.D. study in the U.K. After receiving her Ph.D., she worked at the University of Aizu from 1993 to 2000. She has worked at CIS since 2000.

Dr. Huang has been working in the field of Computer Science and Engineering for nearly 30 years. Since 1982, her research fields have included Computer Supported Collaboration Work, Artificial Intelligence and Multi-agent Systems, Multimedia and Distributed Processing, Computational Intelligence Computing, Ubiquitous Intelligence Computing, Cyberworld Computing, and Aware Computing.

Dr. Huang is a member of IEEE and ACM. She has been active in various academic societies. She has published more than 120 academic refereed papers in the international conferences and journals. She received the Best Paper Award from the 2000 International Conference on Information Society in the 21st Century: Emerging Technologies and New Challenges.

Message

With rapid developments of the Internet and Web technologies, the 21st century is a networked digital information era. Accompanying this era, a new world (Cyberworld) is on the way to be brought out. It is an interesting and a full of mystery world. It is the time for us to discover mysteries and make inventions, in particularly, in the fields of world modeling and finding scientific and social laws for guiding people’s communications, collaborations and educations in this exciting world. Let us face the challenges and enjoy inventions in the 21st century!

My hobby is reading, traveling, cooking, gardening, programming and badminton.

Prof. Michael MCDONALD

Prof. Michael MCDONALD

Michael MCDONALD
Professor (Computer Science)

◾MA in Music

Research area:

  • Technical writing
  • Text analysis

I grew up in Liverpool when the Beatles were just becoming popular. Both my parents were classical musicians. I also studied music at university, but after teaching music for a short time (in Yemen) I became an English teacher, and taught at language schools in England and Japan for 10 years. In 1987 I changed jobs again, when I joined IBM Japan as a technical editor. Since coming to Hosei in 2000, I have been able to combine my two most recent lines of work by teaching both English and technical writing. Of course, I still love music, but it’s just my hobby now.

Message

Every time I meet business people in Japan, I hear the same message: we need people who can speak and understand English. At one time, English was not essential for a high-level career in this country. That is no longer true, especially in the IT world. The globalization of the economy and technology means that most IT business is international, and the common language of international business is English. Our international faculty provides an opportunity not only to study English, but to use it for real communication.

Prof. Yamin LI

Prof. Yamin LI

Computer Architecture Lab

Yamin LI
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D (Computer Science)

Research area:

  • Computer Architecture
  • Parallel and Distributed Systems
  • Mobile Ad Hoc Networks
Laboraory

Yamin LI received his BS, MS, and Ph.D degrees in computer science and engineering from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China in 1982, 1984, 1989, respectively. From 1984 to 1993, he was a faculty member of Tsinghua University. From 1993 to 2000, he was an associate professor of University of Aizu. Since 2000, he has been a professor at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University.

His current research interests include: advanced computer organization and architecture, distributed and parallel computer architecture, parallel multithreaded architecture, and computer arithmetic algorithm and hardware implementation.
He is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of the IEEE Computer Society.

Prof. Shaoying LIU

Prof. Shaoying LIU

High-Quality Software Engineering Lab

Shaoying LIU
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Computer Science)

Research area:

  • Software Engineering
  • Formal Engineering Methods
  • Intelligent Software Engineering
Laboraory

Shaoying LIU was born in Shannxi Province, China on April 25, 1960. He received a B.Sc and an M.Sc. degrees in Computer Science both from Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, China in 1982 and 1987, respectively, and a Ph.D in Computer Science from the University of Manchester, U.K. in 1992. From 1982 to 1988, he worked as an Assistant Lecturer and Lecturer, respectively, in the Department of Computer Science at Xi’an Jiaotong University. From 1991 to 1994, he worked as a Research Associate in the Department of Computer Science at the University of York, and as a Research Assistant in the Department of Computer Science at the Royal Holloway and Bedford New College of London University, respectively. In 1994 he joined Hiroshima City University, Japan, as an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science, and he worked there until March 2000. He was invited as a Visiting Research Fellow by The Queen’s University of Belfast, Northern Ireland, U.K., in 1994, and an Academic Visitor by the Computing Laboratory at Oxford University, U.K., in 1998. In April 2000, he joined the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University, Japan, as an Associate Professor, and then a Professor since April 2001.

His current research areas include: formal engineering methods, internet-based intelligent software engineering supporting environments, and safety-critical and complex computer systems. In particular, he has been concentrating on the research of developing a formal engineering method called SOFL and related software verification techniques, such as fault tree analysis, specification testing, and specification-based program testing.

He is a member of the IEEE Computer Science Society. He received an “Outstanding Paper Award” at 1996 IEEE International Conference on Engineering of Complex Computer Systems (ICECCS’96) and a “Certificate of Appreciation for Outstanding Service as ICFEM’97 General Chair and Founder” at 1997 IEEE International Conference on Formal Engineering Methods (ICFEM’97) from IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Complexity in Computing.

Message

The goal of my research is to provide effective languages, methods, and supporting environments for developing reliable and robust complex software systems. To reach this goal, my own and my group’s research has been centered on the development of a formal engineering method called SOFL, standing for Structured Object-Oriented Formal Language, and the rigorous software verification techniques, such as fault tree analysis and testing. Recently, I am more interested in research on internet-based intelligent software engineering supporting environments, and application of formal engineering methods to safety-critical and complex computer systems.

My hobby includes table tennis, soccer, and Karaoke.

Professor Emeritus

Prof. Kenji OHMORI

Prof. Kenji OHMORI

Kenji OHMORI
Professor Emeritus

Research area:

  • Homotopy
  • Enterprise system
  • Cyberworlds