Program Features

The Department of Digital Media conducts education and research on information and applied systems that rely on computer and network infrastructure.

Elementary courses provide instruction in computer fundamentals as well as the basics of computer programming required for the advanced study of Information Science and Digital Media. In addition, students receive a solid grounding in the core disciplines of Mathematics and Physics, and acquire the skills needed to write research papers and deliver presentations on their research projects and accomplishments.

The department’s mission is to cultivate human resources for service in the digital media field who will be skilled in the use of various computer systems. The digital media field itself comprises an array of disciplines, including the recognition of computer-input images and patterns, computer graphics (CG), which blends imagery from the real world with images created using computers, and visualization technologies which are used to express computer-generated images in forms that humans can understand.

Among the advanced courses, the Computer Graphics and Visualization course allows students to intensify their focus on areas where computer graphics technology has come into wide use. For example, this course provides opportunities to study ways of adapting computer graphics to art, visualizing blends of imagery from the real and virtual worlds, and finding graphical expressions for mathematical equations. In the Multimedia Recognition course, students study topics ranging from the recognition of images and audio to communications technologies for the transfer of multimedia data.

The curriculum also includes an information science project that students start in their first year as a means of honing their skills in conceptualization and the recognition and solution of problems, an Education Assistance course that allows students to serve as assistants in high-school computer education programs, a Special Digital Media Seminar that exposes students to the latest papers of relevance to their graduate thesis, and a Digital Media Graduate Thesis course.

Message from the Department Chair of Digital Media

Welcome to the Department of Digital Media.

There are a lot of computers around us such as smart phones and car navigation systems. Thanks to advances in visualization techniques, we can enjoy 3D movies almost everywhere. The popularity of GPS allows us to get lost less often when we are out driving in new places. These advances largely depend on the progress of computer utilization technologies. We are quite familiar with using computer processing to retouch deformed photographs and images, and to read and recognize blurred letters. Voice recognition technology also has greatly improved our ability to eliminate noise, and recognize important words as well. In other words, computer and its utilization technologies seem to be a part of our lives.

In the achievement of this success, highly developed IT technologies such as programing languages, physics-based calculations, rendering techniques, image processing, speech information processing have contributed. Microscopically, each one is an accumulation of element technologies. However, each of them is not used independently in a computer today, but we are moving toward a new age of systematic use of various kinds of technologies.

Takafumi KOIKE, Professor, Dr.

Takafumi KOIKE, Professor, Dr.

Department Chair of Digital Media

As the development of computers and their applications is quite fast, new ideas including mathematical processing and physics-based calculations are also required for it. As you know, our multimedia society is flooded with information. To make the most of it, you need to learn the most promising basic techniques and acquire the ability to think in a logical way.

Students of Department of Digital Media start with programming languages, which are the basis for various applications in the fields, and learn mathematics and physics, which are important to strengthen your logical thinking. In addition, the department provides various kinds of curricula, which allow you to choose the course you want according to your developing expertise. We believe that you will gain access to advanced technologies when you make use of the knowledge and technology that you acquired through your research in this department. Let’s aim to advance science through your logical perception and new ideas.

Professors of Digital Media

Prof. Katunobu ITOU

Prof. Katunobu ITOU

Speech, Audio and Language Processing Lab

Katunobu ITOU
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Communication Engineering)

Research area:

  • Speech Recognition
  • Multi-Modal Dialog System
  • Speech Interface
Laboratory

Katunobu ITOU received the B.E., M.E. and Ph.D degress in computer science from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1988, 1990 and 1993 respectively. From 2003 to 2006, he was an associate professor at Graduate School of Information Science of the Nagoya University. In 2006, he joined the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University, Japan, as a Professor.

His current research interest is spoken language processing.
He is a member of the Information Processing Society of Japan and the Acoustical Society of Japan.

Prof. Takafumi KOIKE

Prof. Takafumi KOIKE

Computational Reality Lab

Takafumi KOIKE
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Information and Communication Engineering)

Research area:

  • Media technologies connected between real world and cyber world
  • Real-time computer graphics
  • Augmented reality
  • Computational photography
  • 3D imaging
Laboratory

Takafumi Koike received the B.S. in physics from Tokyo Institute of Technology, the M.E. in mathematical engineering and information physics from The University of Tokyo, and Ph.D. in information and communication engineering from The University of Tokyo, in 1995, 1997, and 2009, respectively. He was formerly a senior researcher at Yokohama Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd. Since 2013, he has been a professor at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University.
His research interests include media technologies connected between real world and cyber world, light field displays, computational photography, and virtual/augmented/mixed reality.
He is a member of the ACM, the IEEE, and the OSA.

Message

I want to create a richer society by media technologies. One of my favorite texts is “Think like an amateur and execute like an expert (by Prof. Kanade, CMU)”. If you feel empathy for this text, please contact me!

Prof. Vladimir SAVCHENKO

Prof. Vladimir SAVCHENKO

Shape Modeling Lab

Vladimir SAVCHENKO
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Theoretical Mechanics)

Research area:

  • Geometric Modeling
  • CG
  • Animation
Laboratory

Vladimir SAVCHENKO was born in Taganrog city, Russia, May 15, 1947. He came to Hosei University from the University of Aizu (Japan) where he was a head of Shape Modeling Lab and undergraduate/graduate teacher. Before 1993 he was deputy director and a head of Computational Mechanics Lab at the Scientific Institute of System Analysis of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Moscow). Up to 1987 he was senior research assistant at the Institute of Applied Mathematics of Russian Academy of Sciences.

Education:

  • Institute of Applied Mathematics, Moscow, Russia
  • Ph.D., Theoretical Mechanics, 1982-1985
  • Moscow Aviation Institute, Department “Space crafts”, Moscow, Russia
  • MS, Mechanical Engineering, 1965, Sept., 1971, Feb.
  • His research interests: Geometric Modeling, Computer Graphics, Physically based simulation, Artificial Life, Parallel processing, Haptic Visualization.
  • He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society
  • He received the awards:
  • Bronze Prize Computer Graphics Grand Prix in STEC, Tokyo, Japan, 1996
  • Best WWW Award EUROGRAPHICS’96, Poitiers, 1996
  • Government order “Znak Pocheta”, 1985
  • Government medal “Za Trudowoe Otlichie”, 1975

Message

Shape modeling is an interdisciplinary area composing theoretical and experimental results from mathematics, physics, computer graphics, computer-aided design, computer animation, and others fields. Shape modeling and mathematical simulation stand side by side, and one upholds the other. The heart of my work was solving applied problems of mathematical simulation. In general, I am interested in a problem of mathematical simulation which includes three main parts: mathematical model, numerical method and programming realization.

Now I am involved in a number of projects, such as

Applications of genetic algorithms in shape modeling, Converting elevation contours to a grid, Java implementation of Turtle Graphics in 3-D, Designing client/server applications dealing with geometric modeling.

This projects has been initiated by previous investigations in the field of computer graphics, shape modeling and by recent advance in Java programming. Some of the motivation for this projects can be ascribed to general good sense and the recognition of the Java technology whose time has come. Java provides the right programming paradigm to make use of the distributed machines to speed up calculations. Designing client/server applications may lure students into writing very sophisticated programs, development of collaborative Internet-based computer graphics and shape modeling applications.
Hobbies

Classic music (Tchaikovsky, Beethoven). American country music. Japanese music (Kitaro) and songs (Tanimura).
Water and alpine skiing.

Prof. Yasunari ZEMPO

Prof. Yasunari ZEMPO

Computational Physics Lab

Yasunari ZEMPO
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Physics)

Research area:

  • Computational materials science
  • Development of computational techniques for material design and property prediction
  • Large-scale parallel computing

Yasunari ZEMPO was born in Kure, Japan on May 18, 1956. He received the B.S. and M.S. degree from Hiroshima University in 1980, and 1982, respectively. In the field of theoretical materials science, he received Ph.D. in physics from Hiroshima University, Japan in 1985. He was formerly with Tsukuba Research Laboratory, Sumitomo Chemical, where he was engaged in the computational materials science, and its practical applications using very large scale computers. He was an experienced researcher in the industry, until he joined the faculty of Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University, in 2009.

His current research areas include computational materials science, and computational physics as well as high performance computing.

He is a member of the physical society of Japan, American physical society, and the Japan society for industrial and applied mathematics.

Message

Our society owes its present prosperity to its industrial growth, which is right now realized by computer-simulation based researches. This new type of research is now extensively being applied to all fields of science and engineering. We hope to contribute to the society through our simulation techniques. If you would like to learn the necessary basic skills and techniques, just visit us. Recent computational techniques can be experienced through solving various practical-level exercises and programming.

Prof. Toshihisa NISHIJIMA

Prof. Toshihisa NISHIJIMA

Coding Theory Lab

Toshihisa NISHIJIMA
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Doctor (Engineering)

Research area:

  • Coding Theory
  • Information Theory

Toshihisa NISHIJIMA was born in Hiroshima, Japan on January 10, 1959. He received the B.E., M.E. and Ph.D. degrees in industrial engineering and management from Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan in 1983, 1985, 1991, respectively. From 1985 to 1987, he was with the Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan. He joined the Kanagawa Institute of Technology, Kanagawa, Japan as a Research Associate from 1987 to 1993 and the Faculty Engineering, Hosei University, Tokyo, Japan as an Associate Professor from 1993 to 2000. From 2000 to 2001, he was an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University and then a professor since April 2001.

His current research areas include algebraic coding theory, error control systems, and information theory.

He is a member of the IEEE Information Theory Society, Communications Society, Computer Society, the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineerings of Japan, and the Society for Information Theory and Its Applications of Japan.

Message

I started my academic life in the theory of algebraic error-correcting codes and its applications, and have recently been interested also in information theory. For the past 15 years I have been studying on the asymptotic capability of algebraic error-correcting codes, which are able to prove Shannon’s fundamental theorem for noisy channel not by random coding technique but by constructive coding. Now I would like to study on Shannon’s channel coding theorem from the viewpoints of both the reliability function in information theory and the asymptotic distance ratio in coding theory. As the final purpose (dream) in my academic life, I will try to challenge the fundamental problems to determine the reliability function for low rates and to clarify relationship between the reliability function and the asymptotic distance ratio.

Prof. Hiroshi HANAIZUMI

Prof. Hiroshi HANAIZUMI

Multi-dimensional Image Processing Lab

Hiroshi HANAIZUMI
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Communication Engineering)

Research area:

  • Image Processing
Laboratory

Hiroshi HANAIZUMI was born in Fukushima, Japan on February 16, 1956. He received the B.Sc. degree in communication engineering from the University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo, Japan, in 1978, and the M.Sc. and Dr. Eng. Degrees in instrumentation physics from The University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1980 and 1987, respectively. From 1981 to 1987 he was a research assistant at the Department of Mathematical Engineering and Information Physics, The University of Tokyo. He joined Hosei University in 1987 as a Lecturer in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, and was an Associate Professor from 1989 to 1995, and has been a Professor since 1996. Since 2000, he has been a Professor at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University.

His current research areas include remote sensing, face recognition and 3D medical image processing.

He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society, Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society, Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication engineers, and Society of Instrument and Control Engineers.

Message

My research focuses on image processing and recognition. Images have much information on the objects, for example, remotely sensed images include spectral, spatial and temporal information about terrain objects, and face images personal information. The main purpose of the image processing is to extract the information by using various techniques. Noise reduction is one of very important processing in these techniques. The information extracted is then generalized with the physical properties (priori information) and is used for recognizing “what or how is the object”. The recognized results are used as sources of digital media. I want to realize smart recognition like human. My current research interests are image processing in remote sensing, medical image processing and person recognition from face image. My hobbies are reading and gardening.

Prof. Satoru FUJITA

Prof. Satoru FUJITA

Service Systems Lab

Satoru FUJITA
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Doctor (Engineering)

Research area:

  • XML processing
  • Web service
  • SOA
  • Multi-agent system

Satoru FUJITA was born in Shizuoka, Japan on Jun 25, 1961. He received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in Electronic engineering from Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan in 1984, 1986 respectively. He received the Doctor of Engineering from Tokyo University in 1989. He was formerly with Internet Systems Research Laboratories of NEC Corporation, where he was engaged in design and development of mobile programming language and Web services. Since 2008, he has been a Professor at the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University. His current research areas include human sensing, service computing, and multi-agent based simulation. He is a member of the IEICE of Japan, Information Processing Society of Japan, and the Japanese Sciety for Artificial Intelligence.

Message

I have two basic policies for managing my laboratory. One is respect for individuals and another is higher research motivation. Members are required to find their problems by themselves, and discuss solutions deeply.

Prof. Hiroshi HOSOBE

Prof. Hiroshi HOSOBE

User Interface Lab

Hiroshi HOSOBE
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Science)

Research area:

  • User Interfaces
  • Information Visualization
  • Computer Graphics
  • Constraint Programming
Laboratory

Hiroshi Hosobe received his bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees from the University of Tokyo in 1993, 1995, and 1998 respectively. After serving as a JSPS Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Tokyo and as a Research Associate at the National Center for Science Information Systems, he joined the National Institute of Informatics as a Research Associate in 2000, where he worked as an Associate Professor from 2004 to 2013. In 2005, he spent two months as an Invited Professor in the LINA laboratory at the University of Nantes. He joined Hosei University as a Professor in 2013. He was presented with the Takahashi Award in 2003 by the Japan Society for Software Science and Technology and with the Best Paper Award in 2003 by the 6th Pacific Rim International Workshop on Multi-Agents.

Message

Our lab is studying how to develop software systems, especially, with visual and interactive properties. Although such systems are becoming increasingly important and widespread, the method of their development has remained unchanged for over twenty years; people have been using object-oriented imperative programming languages (e.g. C++, Objective-C, and Java) for this purpose. We are tackling this situation by adopting mathematical approaches such as constraint programming. We welcome your participation in our activities.

Prof. Jianhua MA

Prof. Jianhua MA

Ubiquitous Computing Lab

Jianhua MA
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Doctor of Information Engineering

Research area:

  • Ubiquitous Network and Computing
  • Smart Object, Space and Service
  • Autonomic and Trusted System
Laboratory

Jianhua MA received his B.S. and M.S. degrees of Communication Systems from National University of Defense Technology (NUDT), China, in 1982 and 1985, respectively, and the PhD degree of Information Engineering from Xidian University, China, in 1990. He has joined Hosei University since 2000, and is currently a professor at Digital Media Department in the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences. Prior to joining Hosei University, he had 15 years’ teaching and/or research experiences at NUDT, Xidian University, and The University of Aizu, Japan.

He is teaching the courses of Java Programming, Computer Networks, Multimedia Technologies and Applications, Ubiquitous Computing, Advanced Networking and Computing, CIS Project A/B, and Research Seminars on Advanced Cyber and Ubiquitous Computing.

His research from 1983 to 2002 covered wireless communications, data encryption, speech processing, multimedia QoS, 1-to-m HC hyper-interface, graphics ASIC, e-learning and virtual university, CSCW, multi-agents, Internet audio/video, mobile web service, P2P network, etc. Since 2003, he has been devoted to what he called Smart World and Hyper World pervaded with smart physical u-things, characterized with Ubiquitous Intelligence (u-Intelligence, UI) for u-Services with UbiSafe guarantee. The u-intelligence, actually the whole ubicomp/percomp, should be based on the systematic study of the u-Things and Cyber-Individuals (Cyber-I) in the integrated Cyber-Physical-Social World.

Dr. Ma has published over 200 papers in journals and proceedings, edited over 10 books, made over 15 journal special issues as a Guest Editor, and served many international journals as an Editor-in-Chief or editorial board member. He has organized a lot of conferences as one of chairs. He is a founder of Int’l Conf. on Ubiquitous Intelligence and Computing (UIC), Int’l Conf. on Autonomic and Trusted Computing (ATC), IEEE Conf. on Cyber, Physical and Social Computing (CPSCom), and IEEE Conf. on Internet of Things (iThings). He is a Chair of IEEE CIS Task Force on Autonomic and Trusted Computing, and a co-founder of IEEE Task Force on Ubiquitous Intelligence and Computing.

Access Laboratory to know more about him.

Message

Cyber world is a completely new digital space supported by Internet, Web, cloud, IoT and so on. It is very necessary to find out essential features and develop novel technologies to deal with digital explosions of information, connection, service and intelligence in this new world. The systematic study is important to cover both advanced technological aspects and human factors to realize the harmonious symbiosis of humans, computers, and things in an emerging cyber-physical hyperworld.

Prof. Shuichi YUKITA

Prof. Shuichi YUKITA

Inference Visualization Lab

Shuichi YUKITA
Professor (Computer Science, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Computer Science)

Research area:

  • Cellular Automata Theory
  • Algorithmic Mathematics
  • Mathematical Visualization
Laboraory

Shuichi YUKITA was born in Chiba, Japan on January 12, 1954. He received the B.S. degree in physics, M.S. degree in mathematics from Tokyo University, Tokyo, Japan in 1976 and 1978, respectively. He received the Ph.D. degree in information science from Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan in 2000. From 1983 to 1987, he was with Toyo University, Saitama, Japan. From 1987 to 1993, he was with Wakkanai-Hokusei junior college, Hokkaido, Japan. From 1993 to March/2000, he was with the University of Aizu, Fukushima, Japan. In April 2000, he joined the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences at Hosei University, Japan, as an Associate Professor, and then a Professor since April 2001.

His current research areas include cellular automata theory, algorithmic mathematics, and mathematical visualization.

He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society, IEICE, IPSJ, Mathematical Society of Japan, and JSIAM.

Message

Find your own winning way in the game of theoretical thinking that involves lots of mathematics and scientific discovery. While playing this game, we apply the dialogue engineering (or dialectical) technique. Dialogue may be sometimes monologue, where dialogue occurs between one and oneself, and, of course, dialogue may be actual dialogue in seminar talks and other presentations. My main research theme can be termed as dialogue engineering.

Prof. Toru WAKAHARA

Prof. Toru WAKAHARA

Pattern Recognition Lab

Toru WAKAHARA
Professor (Digital Media, Graduate School)

Ph.D. (Mathematical Engineering and Information Physics)

Research area:

  • Intelligent Image Processing
  • Pattern Recognition
Laboratory

Toru WAKAHARA was born in Gifu, Japan, on January 30, 1952. He received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in applied physics and the Ph.D. degree in mathematical engineering and information physics from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 1975, 1977, and 1986, respectively. From 1977 to 1986, he was with the Basic Research Laboratories, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT), Tokyo, Japan, where he was engaged in research of on-line handwriting recognition. From 1987 to 2000, he was with the Human Interface Laboratories, Cyber Space Laboratories, and Cyber Solutions Laboratories, NTT, Kanagawa, Japan, where he was engaged in research and development of machine-printed and multi-font character recognition system, advanced handwritten character recognition system, pen-based interface, and biometric authentication system. From 1991 to 1993, he was posted to the Institute for Posts and Telecommunications Policy (IPTP), Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications, Japan, where he conducted the first, second, and third IPTP character recognition competitions and studies on multi-expert system for handwritten 3-digit postcode and postal address recognition. Since April 2001, he has been a professor of the Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Hosei University.

His research interests include learning and generalization in pattern recognition, intelligent image processing, human visual perception, and human-computer interaction.

He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society and the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers of Japan (IEICE).

He received a Special Achievement Award in 1994 from the Institute for Posts and Telecommunications Policy (IPTP), Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications, Japan.

Message

A lively intellectual curiosity in your study and research is most essential to taking a genuine delight in your academic life. In order to activate such curiosity, you have to think over what is an important problem worth focusing your energy on. In other words, finding a good problem is most valuable, and its solution is another thing.